I had the pleasure of putting on a mini workshop at the Long Beach UX meetup group after Monish, an amazing designer, teacher and all around great person, had suggested it. I mentioned working on some customer journey mapping for a project at work, and some individuals in the group were unfamiliar.

There is always a bit of nervous excitement to talk about your job. I start asking myself, “Will other people find this as interesting as I do?”, “Will I explain it clearly?”, “Will I fall into the technological rabbit hole and start talking about any and everything?” and I think it all comes down to jumping in and letting the passion flow. I love talking about what I do and design in general because I am quite passionate about it and find it fascinating.

I was told before, “If it gets your heart pumping, then you must be doing something right.”

Considering where I currently work (Amazon), some things concerning the customer journey had to remain elusive, but the core foundational aspects remain the same for most projects, which was what I wanted to convey. I walked the group through some customer journeys I created to give myself and ultimately others a clearer perspective of what our customer goes through to perform a particular task and the friction and pain points they encounter along the way..

 

My maps got more complex as I created a journey map for each use case because their journey’s at certain points became very similar and touched some of the same elements. Meaning, a proposed solution could be ideal for one use case but have no effect on another use case. Each customer journey had one layer for metrics to identify significant drop offs and one layer for pain points identified from usability studies and research. It allowed me to see any correlations between the quantitative and qualitative data in their journeys. After all this mapping, it became easier to identify areas of improvement that would impact all customers and also zero in on specific use cases.

 

I not only find creating journey maps to be extremely useful for communicating with various teams, identifying friction and pain points and helpful when considering the impact of a solution, but I enjoy being able to dive into the customer’s perspective and create something that allows people to focus on the client’s needs.

Everyone has their way of creating a customer journey map, but ultimately it should be clear, straightforward and be visual to aid in the story telling.

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